January 1, 2024
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Food

Balancing Tradition and Wellness: Insights from a Dietitian on Healthy Cultural Eating

Balancing Tradition and Wellness: Insights from a Dietitian on Healthy Cultural Eating

Balancing Tradition and Wellness: Insights from a Dietitian on Healthy Cultural Eating

In a world where healthy eating advice bombards us from every corner, it's easy to feel overwhelmed and confused about making nutritious choices. For those within the African diaspora, the pressure to replace cultural foods with supposedly healthier alternatives can be particularly disheartening. However, Registered Dietitian and Co-Founder of the EatWell Exchange Ashley Carter, challenges this notion, emphasizing that maintaining wellness is not about abandoning cultural traditions but rather embracing them with a focus on balance. In this article, we'll delve into Carter's insights on how individuals can incorporate traditional cultural foods into their modern diet while prioritizing overall wellness.

Incorporating Cultural Foods into Modern Diets

Carter's approach begins by dispelling the myth that cultural foods are incompatible with a healthy lifestyle. She advocates for a balanced plate, as recommended by the USDA, where half of every meal comprises fruits or vegetables, with the other half divided between grains and protein. The key, according to Carter, is to identify favorite vegetables and fruits from one's culture and build meals around them. Protein sources should be varied, including lean proteins and plant-based options like beans, nuts, and legumes. Incorporating favorite grains, such as bread, rice, pasta, or tortillas, completes a well-rounded meal that respects cultural preferences while aligning with dietary guidelines.

Addressing Misconceptions about Traditional Foods

Carter acknowledges the prevalent negative narrative surrounding cultural foods, often associating them with health issues due to their perceived high levels of fat, sugar, and sodium. To counter this, she encourages a shift in perspective, urging individuals to focus on creating a balanced plate without entirely discarding cherished foods. An example she provides is modifying cooking methods, such as reducing saturated fat and cooking times, rather than substituting traditional ingredients. Carter emphasizes the importance of early education about cultural foods and traditions, fostering a sense of pride and understanding that can persist into adulthood.

Preserving Traditions in Diverse Cultural Diets

While acknowledging the significance of cultural foods in preserving traditions, Carter suggests expanding the celebration beyond the table. She proposes creating additional traditions, such as music and dance, to complement the culinary aspects. Encouraging smaller portions of traditional dishes and spending more time in the kitchen learning from elders are strategies to strike a balance between tradition and modern nutritional needs. Carter advocates for exploring healthier variations of traditional recipes, maintaining the essence of the dish while making mindful modifications.

Practical Tips for Exploring Cultural Cuisines

Carter offers practical tips for individuals looking to explore and embrace the nutritional benefits of various cultural cuisines without compromising health goals. These include self-assessment of current dietary habits, creating a menu based on favorite vegetables, decreasing sodium through the use of herbs and spices, and mindful alcohol consumption during holidays. By integrating these tips, individuals can embark on a journey of discovery and healthful eating that aligns with their cultural background.

Contribution to a Holistic Approach to Nutrition

The integration of cultural diversity into one's diet, according to Carter, contributes to a more holistic approach to nutrition. Beyond nutrients, vitamins, and minerals, cultural foods evoke memories, emotions, and a sense of belonging. Carter emphasizes the importance of preserving these elements while advocating for mindful cooking techniques that retain the texture and nutrients of vegetables. She underscores the need for a conscious lifestyle change, where small, consistent modifications lead to a healthier, happier version of oneself.

By embracing cultural foods and making informed, balanced decisions, individuals can achieve a harmonious integration of tradition and modern nutrition. Carter's practical tips empower individuals to embark on a journey of exploration, ensuring that cultural diversity not only enriches their culinary experiences but also contributes to a holistic approach to nutrition and well-being.


Ashley Carter MS, RD, LDN
Expert
Ashley Carter MS, RD, LDN

Registered Dietitian & Licensed Dietitian and Nutritionist

Balancing Tradition and Wellness: Insights from a Dietitian on Healthy Cultural Eating
  •  
Food

Balancing Tradition and Wellness: Insights from a Dietitian on Healthy Cultural Eating

In a world where healthy eating advice bombards us from every corner, it's easy to feel overwhelmed and confused about making nutritious choices. For those within the African diaspora, the pressure to replace cultural foods with supposedly healthier alternatives can be particularly disheartening. However, Registered Dietitian and Co-Founder of the EatWell Exchange Ashley Carter, challenges this notion, emphasizing that maintaining wellness is not about abandoning cultural traditions but rather embracing them with a focus on balance. In this article, we'll delve into Carter's insights on how individuals can incorporate traditional cultural foods into their modern diet while prioritizing overall wellness.

Incorporating Cultural Foods into Modern Diets

Carter's approach begins by dispelling the myth that cultural foods are incompatible with a healthy lifestyle. She advocates for a balanced plate, as recommended by the USDA, where half of every meal comprises fruits or vegetables, with the other half divided between grains and protein. The key, according to Carter, is to identify favorite vegetables and fruits from one's culture and build meals around them. Protein sources should be varied, including lean proteins and plant-based options like beans, nuts, and legumes. Incorporating favorite grains, such as bread, rice, pasta, or tortillas, completes a well-rounded meal that respects cultural preferences while aligning with dietary guidelines.

Addressing Misconceptions about Traditional Foods

Carter acknowledges the prevalent negative narrative surrounding cultural foods, often associating them with health issues due to their perceived high levels of fat, sugar, and sodium. To counter this, she encourages a shift in perspective, urging individuals to focus on creating a balanced plate without entirely discarding cherished foods. An example she provides is modifying cooking methods, such as reducing saturated fat and cooking times, rather than substituting traditional ingredients. Carter emphasizes the importance of early education about cultural foods and traditions, fostering a sense of pride and understanding that can persist into adulthood.

Preserving Traditions in Diverse Cultural Diets

While acknowledging the significance of cultural foods in preserving traditions, Carter suggests expanding the celebration beyond the table. She proposes creating additional traditions, such as music and dance, to complement the culinary aspects. Encouraging smaller portions of traditional dishes and spending more time in the kitchen learning from elders are strategies to strike a balance between tradition and modern nutritional needs. Carter advocates for exploring healthier variations of traditional recipes, maintaining the essence of the dish while making mindful modifications.

Practical Tips for Exploring Cultural Cuisines

Carter offers practical tips for individuals looking to explore and embrace the nutritional benefits of various cultural cuisines without compromising health goals. These include self-assessment of current dietary habits, creating a menu based on favorite vegetables, decreasing sodium through the use of herbs and spices, and mindful alcohol consumption during holidays. By integrating these tips, individuals can embark on a journey of discovery and healthful eating that aligns with their cultural background.

Contribution to a Holistic Approach to Nutrition

The integration of cultural diversity into one's diet, according to Carter, contributes to a more holistic approach to nutrition. Beyond nutrients, vitamins, and minerals, cultural foods evoke memories, emotions, and a sense of belonging. Carter emphasizes the importance of preserving these elements while advocating for mindful cooking techniques that retain the texture and nutrients of vegetables. She underscores the need for a conscious lifestyle change, where small, consistent modifications lead to a healthier, happier version of oneself.

By embracing cultural foods and making informed, balanced decisions, individuals can achieve a harmonious integration of tradition and modern nutrition. Carter's practical tips empower individuals to embark on a journey of exploration, ensuring that cultural diversity not only enriches their culinary experiences but also contributes to a holistic approach to nutrition and well-being.


Ashley Carter MS, RD, LDN
Expert Referenced
Ashley Carter MS, RD, LDN

Registered Dietitian & Licensed Dietitian and Nutritionist

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